Imprints: East Indian Impressions launched at the National Museum

Caption: Getting a Closer Look – A patron at the launch of Imprints: East Indian Impressions get a closer look at Nyla Singh’s Portraits of Centenarians. (Photo courtesy the Ministry of Community Development, Culture and Arts)

May 31, 2017: On Friday 26th May, 2017, the National Museum and Art Gallery launched Imprints: East Indian Impressions. The exhibition commemorates Indian Arrival 2017 and the 100th Anniversary of the Abolition of Indentureship. Imprints, which is mounted at the Main Art Gallery, features  paintings, costumes, fashion, film and craft, influenced by Trinidad and Tobago’s East Indian Heritage.

Ms Beverly Reid-Samuel, Deputy Permanent Secretary – Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts delivered the feature address on behalf of Dr. the Honourable Nyan Gadsby-Dolly, Minister of Community Development, Culture and the Arts. Ms. Reid shared with those present that they will have the first view of a collection that gives “a panoramic view of our fore parents’ journey. This exhibition, carefully curated by Nisha Hosein, covers paintings of indentured labourers; photographs of the last wave of migrants; rangoli, mehendi arts and many more of items of our shared East Indian Heritage.”

Ms Lorraine Johnson, Curator – National Museum and Art Gallery expressed her pride in the latest exhibition, “Our goal is to foster public awareness of Trinidad and Tobago’s heritage.  Sometimes, the things we see and do every day become mundane, taken for granted. The purpose of this exhibit, therefore, is to raise the mundane to the magnificent; the vast array of work on display gives insights into our past, and glimpses into our evolving future.”

One patron, Kavita Ganness-Budhooram, Teacher and Literary Artist praised the all- encompassing nature of the exhibit, “I felt it covered all aspects of East Indian culture: Hinduism, Islam, fashion and art. It really dealt with a lot of themes.”

The launch featured tassa, authentic East Indian foods including pani puri, gulab jamun and spiced fruit. Patrons also had the chance to have mehindi done by Sah Fyhr. Some of the pieces which attracted the attention of  patrons  were Wendy Nanan’s papier mache pieces that literally came out of the walls; Rangoli Bedi by Aneesa Karim and Richard Rampersad, Nyla Singh’s Portraits of Centenarians,  Shalini Seereeram’s mixed media pieces.

Imprints: East Indian Impressions will remain open until July 15, 2017 at the National Museum and Arts Gallery, Frederick Street, Port of Spain.
Tuesday – Saturday from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. (Closed on Public Holidays.)

The National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago, is under the purview of the Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts, and its mission is to foster public awareness, understanding and enjoyment of Trinidad and Tobago’s Human and Natural Heritage through the collection, preservation, research, presentation and interpretation of significant and representative collections of that heritage.

An Intricate Process - Ms Beverly Reid-Samuel, Deputy Permanent Secretary – Ministry of Community Development, Culture and the Arts (L) looks at a work of art directed by Mr. Ramrah Mathew Thomas of the Cedros Hosay Association (centre) as he explains the process of building tadjahs to Ms Nisha Hosein, Curator, Imprints: East Indian Impressions on Friday 26th May, 2017.

 

Ms Lorraine Johnson, Curator – National Museum and Art Gallery poses with Mr. Richard Rampersad in front his work of art at the Launch of Imprints: East Indian Impression

 

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For further information please contact:

The Corporate Communications Unit

Ministry of Community Development, Culture

868-624-5004

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